A Great Deception

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Memorandum of Conversation 24 May 1951 - Shakabpa and Wilkins

Dalai Lama Cables

The Dalai Lama Cables: No Noble Peace - Part 1

In this series of articles we will comprehensively refute the Dalai Lama's qualification for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Throughout the articles please bear in mind the words of Egil Aarvik when presenting the Dalai Lama with the 1989 Nobel Peace Prize:

‘This year’s Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded ... first and foremost for his consistent resistance to the use of violence in his people’s struggle to regain their liberty.
This is by no means the first community of exiles in the world, but it is assuredly the first and only one that has not set up any militant liberation movement.’

Please also bear in mind that the Dalai Lama is a fully ordained Buddhist monk with vows to forsake killing and any actions of harming others.

The People's Liberation Army of Communist China entered Tibet on 7 October 1950.

Here we publish excerpts from a United States Foreign Service Top Secret Memorandum of Conversation between the Tsepon Shakabpa, acting as the personal representative of the Dalai Lama, and Fraser Wilkins, the First Secretary of the US Embassy in New Delhi. The conversation took place on 24 May 1951.

Shakabpa has three questions for Mr Fraser. His third question, which we highlight here, is quite direct:

'If the Dalai Lama left Tibet would the United States be willing to supply the Dalai Lama with military assistance and loans of money?'

Shakabpa is asking this question as the personal representative of the Dalai Lama. This means he is asking the question on behalf of the Dalai Lama. Effectively the Dalai Lama is asking, through an intermediary, for military assistance from the United States.

He adds that the Dalai Lama is the temporal head of Tibet and...

'would therefore when the time was ripe want to supply groups with arms so they could rise against the invader'.

How does this fit with the Dalai Lama's image of 'consistent resistance to the use of violence in his people’s struggle to regain their liberty'?

* Continue to: Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Epilogue

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